RSSCategory: Biotechnology

The invisible infertile: how cultural beliefs can shape statistics

The invisible infertile: how cultural beliefs can shape statistics

An estimated 15% of couples worldwide are infertile. But measuring infertility across populations is not easy, especially when some social groups are under the radar of survey data sources.

December 7, 2017 | By | Reply More
How to talk to your doctor about information you find online

How to talk to your doctor about information you find online

Not everyone is keen on patients getting medical information from the internet. Some heath professionals have doubts about the quality and usefulness of the information available. There are also suggestions that “cyberchrondria” may be fuelling a surge in unnecessary tests and appointments.

December 6, 2017 | By | Reply More
How an historic heart transplant created a celebrity scientist 50 years ago

How an historic heart transplant created a celebrity scientist 50 years ago

South Africa’s Chris Barnard stands out in medical history as the heart surgeon who became a global household name after transplanting the first human heart on 3 December 1967. The historic surgery captured the world’s imagination and was hailed by 20th-century historians as socially and scientifically of equal significance compared to the moon-landing in 1969.

December 4, 2017 | By | Reply More
What gives with the rising cost of the pneumococcal vaccine?

What gives with the rising cost of the pneumococcal vaccine?

The vaccine’s formulation has remained mostly unchanged since its 2010 federal approval, but its price continues creeping up, increasing by about 5 or 6 percent most years. In just eight years, its cost has climbed by more than 50 percent.

November 29, 2017 | By | Reply More
FDA warns about stem cell therapies

FDA warns about stem cell therapies

Stem cells have been called everything from cure-alls to miracle treatments. But don’t believe the hype. Some unscrupulous providers offer stem cell products that are both unapproved and unproven. So beware of potentially dangerous procedures—and confirm what’s really being offered before you consider any treatment

November 16, 2017 | By | Reply More
Sip wine and chat about postponing motherhood — At an ‘Egg Social’

Sip wine and chat about postponing motherhood — At an ‘Egg Social’

In the past, egg freezing was primarily for women who risked infertility because of cancer treatments. But in recent years, more women have been choosing to freeze their eggs for non-medical reasons — such as not being ready to have a baby.

November 13, 2017 | By | Reply More
Liquid Gold: Pain Doctors Soak Up Profits By Screening Urine For Drugs

Liquid Gold: Pain Doctors Soak Up Profits By Screening Urine For Drugs

Drug testing, driven by the nation’s epidemic of painkiller addiction, generates profits across the doctor-owned network of 54 clinics, the largest pain-treatment practice in the Southeast. Medicare paid the company at least $11 million for urine and related tests in 2014, when five of its professionals stood among the nation’s top billers.

November 7, 2017 | By | Reply More
How seeing problems in the brain makes stigma disappear

How seeing problems in the brain makes stigma disappear

As a psychiatrist, I find that one of the hardest parts of my job is telling parents and their children that they are not to blame for their illness. Children with emotional and behavioral problems continue to suffer considerable stigma. But dramatic advances in brain imaging, genetics and other technologies are helping us objectively identify the neurological causes of mental illness.

October 20, 2017 | By | Reply More
Desperate quest for herpes cure launched ‘rogue’ trial

Desperate quest for herpes cure launched ‘rogue’ trial

The lead U.S. researcher, William Halford, openly acknowledged he was flouting Food and Drug Administration regulations in the consent forms they signed. He would be injecting them with a live, though weakened, herpes virus without U.S. safety oversight.

October 19, 2017 | By | Reply More
New gene therapies could cost more than $1m per patient

New gene therapies could cost more than $1m per patient

Outrage over the high cost of cancer care has focused on skyrocketing drug prices, including the $475,000 price tag for the country’s first gene therapy, Novartis’ Kymriah, a leukemia treatment approved in August. But the total costs of Kymriah and the 21 similar drugs in development — known as CAR T-cell therapies — will be far higher than many have imagined, reaching $1 million or more per patient.

October 17, 2017 | By | Reply More