RSSCategory: Brain and Nervous System

Can a brain injury change who you are?

Can a brain injury change who you are?

Phineas Gage was a well-mannered, respectable, smart business man, but after a severe brain injury became irresponsible, rude and aggressive. He was careless and unable to make good decisions. Was his brain injury the cause of his personality change?

April 20, 2018 | By | Reply More
Scientists teach computers how to analyze brain cells

Scientists teach computers how to analyze brain cells

According to a new study in Cell, it may be possible to teach machines how to pick out features in neurons and other cells that have not been stained or undergone other damaging treatments.

April 12, 2018 | By | Reply More
What we know and don’t know about memory loss after surgery

What we know and don’t know about memory loss after surgery

Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a little-known condition that affects a substantial number of older adults after surgery. Some patients experience memory problems; others have difficulty multitasking, learning new things, following multistep procedures or setting priorities. Most of the time, POCD is transient and patients get better in several months. But sometimes — how often hasn’t been determined — this condition lasts up to a year or longer.

April 12, 2018 | By | Reply More
Seattle homeless shelter resident hospitalized with meningitis

Seattle homeless shelter resident hospitalized with meningitis

A resident of a homeless shelter in Seattle tested positive for bacterial meningitis (meningococcal disease) on March 18. The patient, a man in his 60s, is hospitalized and his condition is improving. The bacteria that causes meningococcal disease spreads through direct contact with infectious saliva or respiratory droplets (e.g. being coughed, sneezed or spit on, sharing utensils, bottles, cigarettes or pipes).

March 20, 2018 | By | Reply More
Even infants who appear normal may have Zika brain damage, study

Even infants who appear normal may have Zika brain damage, study

Zika virus may cause significant damage to the fetal brain even when the baby’s head size is normal, according to a new animal study led by researchers at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle. The damage, which can be difficult to detect even with sophisticated brain scans, may also occur in children infected during early childhood and adolescence, the researchers warn.

March 17, 2018 | By | Reply More
Yes, too much sugar is bad for our health – here’s what the science says

Yes, too much sugar is bad for our health – here’s what the science says

Sugar tends to increase you’re belly fat — visceral fat is especially harmful because it increases the risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes. But what does the science say about sugar and the raft of other conditions we see in the headlines every other week? Let’s look at two examples: dementia and cancer.

March 10, 2018 | By | 1 Reply More
How your brain is wired to just say ‘yes’ to opioids

How your brain is wired to just say ‘yes’ to opioids

When opioids enter the brain, they bind to receptors known as μ (mu) opioid receptors on brain cells, or neurons. These receptors stimulate the “reward center” of the brain. Over time, those receptors become less sensitive, and more of the drug is needed to stimulate the reward center.

March 4, 2018 | By | 1 Reply More
Trump’s perfect score on brain test spawns DIY cognitive exam

Trump’s perfect score on brain test spawns DIY cognitive exam

When Donald Trump aced a cognitive test in January, scores of people tried to take it, too, based mostly on media reports that invited them to match wits with the president. Casual users puzzled over line drawings of animals, while others wondered what it meant if they were bad at subtracting by sevens.

February 27, 2018 | By | Reply More
How Alzheimer’s disease spreads throughout the brain – new study

How Alzheimer’s disease spreads throughout the brain – new study

A new study finds the tau protein, which has been implicated in Alzheimer’s disease, spreads between connected neurons. This suggests you might be able to prevent or freeze the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease by preventing the spread of the protein from neuron to neuron.

January 8, 2018 | By | Reply More
Neuroscience in pictures: the best images of the year from the Queensland Brain Institute

Neuroscience in pictures: the best images of the year from the Queensland Brain Institute

To understand how the healthy brain works and what occurs in brain disease, neuroscientists use many microscopy techniques, ranging from whole-brain human MRIs to imaging within a single neuron (brain cell), creating stunning images in the process.

December 26, 2017 | By | Reply More