RSSCategory: Mental Illness

How seeing problems in the brain makes stigma disappear

How seeing problems in the brain makes stigma disappear

As a psychiatrist, I find that one of the hardest parts of my job is telling parents and their children that they are not to blame for their illness. Children with emotional and behavioral problems continue to suffer considerable stigma. But dramatic advances in brain imaging, genetics and other technologies are helping us objectively identify the neurological causes of mental illness.

October 20, 2017 | By | Reply More
Hospitals step in to help house the homeless. Will it make a difference?

Hospitals step in to help house the homeless. Will it make a difference?

Hospitals around the country are taking steps to help homeless people find housing. Doing so, they say, will limit unnecessary ER visits and reduce wasteful health care spending.

October 18, 2017 | By | Reply More
What is mindfulness? Nobody really knows, and that’s a problem

What is mindfulness? Nobody really knows, and that’s a problem

Mindfulness receives a bewildering assortment of definitions. Psychologists measure the concept in differing combinations of acceptance, attentiveness, awareness, body focus, curiosity, nonjudgmental attitude, focus on the present, and others. It’s equally ill-defined as a set of practices.

October 17, 2017 | By | Reply More
‘Katrina Brain’: The invisible long-term toll of megastorms

‘Katrina Brain’: The invisible long-term toll of megastorms

Health officials say that, in the aftermath of an extreme weather event like a hurricane, the toll of long-term psychological injuries builds in the months and years that follow, outpacing more immediate injuries and swamping the health care system long after emergency workers go home and shelters shut down.

October 13, 2017 | By | Reply More
The secret to chronic happiness as you age

The secret to chronic happiness as you age

The real key to happiness at every age and stage — particularly old age — is not material things, but gratitude for life’s simple blessings, like laughter among friends or watching a sunset with a loved one.

September 5, 2017 | By | Reply More
Mayo Pain Expert: Holistic approach helps patients ditch opioids

Mayo Pain Expert: Holistic approach helps patients ditch opioids

Instead of a purely medical approach, the program takes a “biopsychosocial approach,” which recognizes that psychological and social variables contribute to how people experience pain.

August 30, 2017 | By | Reply More
Writing your way through cancer

Writing your way through cancer

Expressive writing gained the attention of psychologists and medical doctors in the 1990s, when research came out about the value of disclosure and writing in the healing process. Since then, multiple studies have revealed writing’s salutary effects on people who are combating illnesses.

August 25, 2017 | By | Reply More
Gun sellers join forces to curb suicide-by-firearm, rampant in rural areas

Gun sellers join forces to curb suicide-by-firearm, rampant in rural areas

Across the country, suicide rates are higher in rural areas than in urban centers. In 2015, rural communities saw 19 people per 100,000 kill themselves, compared with 11 per 100,000 in urban areas, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s injury statistics database.

August 19, 2017 | By | Reply More
How a community-based approach to mental health is making strides in Zimbabwe

How a community-based approach to mental health is making strides in Zimbabwe

Patients diagnosed with a mental health issue are referred to the friendship bench where they are met by a trained community counsellor who offers them counseling. Counsellors are trained to use local terms that patients feel comfortable with, such as Kuvhura pfungwa _(opening the mind), _kusimudzira (uplifting) and kusimbisa (to strengthen).

July 23, 2017 | By | Reply More
Depression among heart attack survivors can be deadly, yet is often ignored

Depression among heart attack survivors can be deadly, yet is often ignored

One in 5 people hospitalized for a heart attack or chest pain develop major depression — about four times the rate in the general population. One in 3 stroke survivors become depressed, along with up to half of those who undergo heart bypass surgery. Heart disease patients who become depressed are twice as likely to die within the following decade as other patients.

July 20, 2017 | By | Reply More