Recent Articles

Hazy days: wildfire smoke and your health

August 3, 2017 | By | Reply More
Hazy days: wildfire smoke and your health

 Wildfire smoke contains small particles and other chemicals that irritate the eyes, nose, throat and lungs. It can cause your eyes to burn and your nose run, and lead to wheezing, coughing, shortness of breath and headaches. It can also aggravate existing lung, heart, and circulatory conditions, including asthma and angina.

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Hot weather safety – tips from the Washington State Department of Health

August 3, 2017 | By | Reply More
Hot weather safety – tips from the Washington State Department of Health

Severe heat may cause illness or even death. When temperatures rise to extreme highs, reduce risks by taking the following precautions.

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Should you put sunscreen on infants? Not usually, says FDA

August 3, 2017 | By | Reply More
Should you put sunscreen on infants? Not usually, says FDA

“Babies’ skin is less mature compared to adults, and infants have a higher surface-area to body-weight ratio. These factors mean that an infant’s exposure to the chemicals in sunscreens may be much greater, increasing the risk of side effects.”

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When wounds won’t heal, therapies spread — To the tune of $5 billion

August 3, 2017 | By | Reply More
When wounds won’t heal, therapies spread — To the tune of $5 billion

Carol Emanuele has open diabetic wound on the bottom of her foot that leaves her unable to walk and prone to deadly infection. Doctors at a Philadelphia clinic have prescribed a dizzying array of treatments: freeze-dried placenta, penis foreskin cells, high doses of pressurized oxygen. “I do everything, but nothing seems to work,” she says.

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Inslee names Cheryl Strange secretary of DSHS

August 2, 2017 | By | Reply More
Inslee names Cheryl Strange secretary of DSHS

Gov. Jay Inslee has named Cheryl Strange secretary of the Department of Social and Health Services.

Strange has served as chief executive officer of Western State Hospital since April 2016. Strange replaces acting DSHS secretary Bill Moss.

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Drug puts a $750,000 ‘price tag on life’

August 2, 2017 | By | Reply More
Drug puts a $750,000 ‘price tag on life’

In April, Gundy’s child, who is on private insurance, began getting the drug Spinraza, which costs $750,000 for the initial year of treatment. Chaffin’s child — a Medicaid enrollee — was not receiving the drug, as his state regulators debated whether to offer it to children like him who use ventilators to breathe.

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Middlemen who save $$ on medicines — but maybe not for you

August 2, 2017 | By | Reply More
Middlemen who save $$ on medicines — but maybe not for you

Pharmacy benefit managers — companies that are often unnoticed and even less understood by most consumers — hold an important place in the prescription drug-pricing pipeline. In this video, Kaiser Health News details the emergence of these multimillion-dollar corporations and the impact they have on medication costs and patients’ access to these treatments.

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Five reasons why hot weather raises health alarms

August 1, 2017 | By | Reply More
Five reasons why hot weather raises health alarms

Hot weather isn’t just uncomfortable – it can be dangerous. When temperatures are very hot in King County, we see a rise in the number of hospitalizations, 911 calls, and, sadly, deaths. And it’s not just heat stroke and heat exhaustion: heart problems, stroke, and kidney failure are common health problems on hot days.

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A bipartisan health care fix? Governors have some ideas

August 1, 2017 | By | Reply More
A bipartisan health care fix? Governors have some ideas

The apparent demise of the Republican drive to scrap the Affordable Care Act may open the door to bipartisan fixes to the law. If it does, some of the proposals being touted by a bipartisan group of governors may get a hearing on Capitol Hill.

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Many still sidestep end-of-life care planning, study finds

August 1, 2017 | By | Reply More
Many still sidestep end-of-life care planning, study finds

Even though advance directives for end-of-life care have been promoted for nearly 50 years, only about a third of U.S. adults have them. People with chronic illnesses were only slightly more likely than healthy individuals to document their wishes.

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