Recent Articles

Possible case of PrEP-resistant HIV reported in King County

March 12, 2018 | By | Reply More
Possible case of PrEP-resistant HIV reported in King County

A community medical provider in King County recently notified Public Health of a man with newly diagnosed HIV infection found to have a virus resistant to both of the medications in the HIV Pre-exposure Prophylaxis, better known as PrEP, which is marketed as Truvada.

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New technologies help seniors age in place — and not feel alone

March 12, 2018 | By | Reply More
New technologies help seniors age in place — and not feel alone

Voice-assistive technologies like the Amazon Echo, Google Home and HomePod are likely to play a bigger role in helping seniors age in place, especially when paired with apps geared specifically for senior living.

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Yes, too much sugar is bad for our health – here’s what the science says

March 10, 2018 | By | 1 Reply More
Yes, too much sugar is bad for our health – here’s what the science says

Sugar tends to increase you’re belly fat — visceral fat is especially harmful because it increases the risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes. But what does the science say about sugar and the raft of other conditions we see in the headlines every other week? Let’s look at two examples: dementia and cancer.

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Aid-in-dying gains momentum as former opponents change their minds

March 10, 2018 | By | Reply More
Aid-in-dying gains momentum as former opponents change their minds

John Baudanza and his wife, Amanda three days after John was diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer. Baudanza supported medical aid-in-dying, which the Massachusetts Legislature is debating. He died in physical agony, Amanda said, in his parents’ home on Cape Cod in 2015.

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Mind over body: A psychiatrist tells how to tap into wisdom and grow with age

March 9, 2018 | By | Reply More
Mind over body: A psychiatrist tells how to tap into wisdom and grow with age

As we get older and experience a great variety of things, including adversity and loss, we continue to develop and mature in terms of how we view the world. We tend to be better able to weigh competing points of view and find ways to understand and accept them.

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From the ER to Inpatient care — at home

March 6, 2018 | By | Reply More
From the ER to Inpatient care — at home

Brigham Health in Boston is one of a slowly growing number of health systems that encourage selected acutely ill emergency department patients who are stable and don’t need intensive, round-the-clock care to opt for hospital-level care at home.

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How historical disease detectives are solving mysteries of the 1918 flu

March 6, 2018 | By | Reply More
How historical disease detectives are solving mysteries of the 1918 flu

The deadly 1918 epidemic posed a few epidemiological puzzles. The virus spread in an unusual way. Early outbreaks were mild and local – reported in a handful of countries around the world in the first half of 1918 – only to turn into uniquely severe infections later that year.

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Need a medical procedure? Pick the right provider and get cash back

March 5, 2018 | By | Reply More
Need a medical procedure? Pick the right provider and get cash back

Health plans are paying patients to use lower-cost services. It’s part of a strategy to rein in health care spending by steering patients to the most cost-effective providers for non-emergency care.

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Number of homeless deaths in Seattle and King County doubles over past five years.

March 5, 2018 | By | Reply More
Number of homeless deaths in Seattle and King County doubles over past five years.

The increase in deaths among the homeless parallels an overall increase in the estimated number of people living unsheltered in King County. Approximately half of the deaths occurred outdoors.

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How your brain is wired to just say ‘yes’ to opioids

March 4, 2018 | By | 1 Reply More
How your brain is wired to just say ‘yes’ to opioids

When opioids enter the brain, they bind to receptors known as μ (mu) opioid receptors on brain cells, or neurons. These receptors stimulate the “reward center” of the brain. Over time, those receptors become less sensitive, and more of the drug is needed to stimulate the reward center.

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