Tag: Featured

State prison partnerships improve public health and safety

State prison partnerships improve public health and safety

State corrections officials Officials say the collaborations can improve public health and safety while providing states with a better return on the money spent on treating offenders while they are in prison.

March 22, 2018 | By | Reply More
Graphic: Opioid Painkiller Is Top Prescription In 11 States

Graphic: Opioid Painkiller Is Top Prescription In 11 States

Americans fill about 4.5 billion prescriptions each year, at a cost of more than $323 billion. But what are we actually buying? In 11 states, the top prescriptions are opioid pain pills that are mixtures of acetaminophen and hydrocodone.

March 22, 2018 | By | Reply More
Thousands of disabled lose right to vote under ‘incompetence’ laws

Thousands of disabled lose right to vote under ‘incompetence’ laws

Laws in 39 states and Washington, D.C., allow judges to strip voting rights from people with mental disorders ranging from schizophrenia to Down syndrome who are deemed “incapacitated” or “incompetent.” Some of those states use archaic language like “idiots” or “insane persons” in their statutes.

March 21, 2018 | By | Reply More
Reporter’s Notebook: The Tale Of Theranos And The Mysterious Fire Alarm

Reporter’s Notebook: The Tale Of Theranos And The Mysterious Fire Alarm

Theranos generated huge hype and laudatory coverage in places like The New Yorker, Wired and Fortune by selling a compelling idea — even as its PR people couldn’t show me an actual patient who had benefited.

March 21, 2018 | By | Reply More
States aren’t waiting for feds to ban flame retardants from kids’ products

States aren’t waiting for feds to ban flame retardants from kids’ products

Washington state was the first in the nation to ban the flame retardant decaBDE. Many other states are doing the same in light of lack of federal action.

March 20, 2018 | By | Reply More
Seattle homeless shelter resident hospitalized with meningitis

Seattle homeless shelter resident hospitalized with meningitis

A resident of a homeless shelter in Seattle tested positive for bacterial meningitis (meningococcal disease) on March 18. The patient, a man in his 60s, is hospitalized and his condition is improving. The bacteria that causes meningococcal disease spreads through direct contact with infectious saliva or respiratory droplets (e.g. being coughed, sneezed or spit on, sharing utensils, bottles, cigarettes or pipes).

March 20, 2018 | By | Reply More
5 important tips for staying safe when cleaning areas with rodents

5 important tips for staying safe when cleaning areas with rodents

Some mice (deer mice, specifically) can carry hantavirus in their urine and droppings, This virus is rare, but can be potentially deadly in humans. So, if you are doing your annual spring cleaning and notice signs of infestation, take caution when cleaning it up.

March 19, 2018 | By | Reply More
Docs worry there’s ‘nowhere to send’ new and expectant moms with depression

Docs worry there’s ‘nowhere to send’ new and expectant moms with depression

Nationally, depression affects up to 1 in 7 women during or after pregnancy, but of those women who screen positive for the condition, 78 percent don’t get mental health treatment.

March 19, 2018 | By | Reply More
1 in 6 American adults binge drink about once a week

1 in 6 American adults binge drink about once a week

CDC researchers found that 1 in 6, or 37 million, adults binge drink about once a week, consuming an average of seven drinks per binge. Binge drinking is defined as consuming five or more drinks for men, or four or more drinks for women, in about two hours.

March 19, 2018 | By | Reply More
Even infants who appear normal may have Zika brain damage, study

Even infants who appear normal may have Zika brain damage, study

Zika virus may cause significant damage to the fetal brain even when the baby’s head size is normal, according to a new animal study led by researchers at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle. The damage, which can be difficult to detect even with sophisticated brain scans, may also occur in children infected during early childhood and adolescence, the researchers warn.

March 17, 2018 | By | Reply More