Recent Articles

Training new doctors right where they’re needed

October 9, 2017 | By | Reply More
Training new doctors right where they’re needed

Dr. Olga Meave didn’t mind the dry, 105-degree heat that scorched this Central Valley city on a recent afternoon. The sweltering summer days remind her of home in Sonora, Mexico. So do the people of the Valley — especially the Latino first-generation immigrants present here in large numbers, toiling in the fields or piloting big rigs laden with fruits and vegetables.

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Chilled proteins and 3-D images: The cryo-electron microscopy technology that just won a Nobel Prize

October 7, 2017 | By | Reply More
Chilled proteins and 3-D images: The cryo-electron microscopy technology that just won a Nobel Prize

Cryo-electron microscopy – or cryo-EM – is an imaging technology that allows scientists to obtain pictures of the biological “machines” that work inside our cells. Most amazingly, it can reconstruct individual snapshots into movie-like scenes that show how protein components of these biological machines move and interact with each other.

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Are self-driving cars the future of mobility for disabled people?

October 6, 2017 | By | Reply More
Are self-driving cars the future of mobility for disabled people?

Self-driving cars could revolutionize how disabled people get around their communities and even travel far from home. People who can’t see well or with physical or mental difficulties that prevent them from driving safely often rely on others – or local government or nonprofit agencies – to help them get around.

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States scramble to overcome Congress’ failure to move on CHIP

October 6, 2017 | By | Reply More
States scramble to overcome Congress’ failure to move on CHIP

Congress’ failure to reauthorize the Children’s Health Insurance Program leaves states facing difficult choices about who will continue to get health coverage.

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Moms of children with rare genetic illness push for wider newborn screening

October 5, 2017 | By | Reply More
Moms of children with rare genetic illness push for wider newborn screening

The serious form of the Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) typically strikes boys between ages 4 and 10. Most are diagnosed too late for treatment to be successful, and they often die before their 10th birthday.

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The opioid epidemic in 6 charts

October 5, 2017 | By | Reply More
The opioid epidemic in 6 charts

The data show that the situation is dire and getting worse. Until opioids are prescribed more cautiously and until effective opioid addiction treatment becomes easier to access, overdose deaths will likely remain at record high levels.

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Rabid bat found on school grounds in Woodinville

October 4, 2017 | By | Reply More
Rabid bat found on school grounds in Woodinville

A rabid bat was found on the playground of Bear Creek Elementary School in Woodinville on the morning of Monday, October 2. If you or your child had any recent contact with a bat at Bear Creek Elementary School, contact Public Health.

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Texas official after Harvey: The ‘Red Cross was not there’

October 4, 2017 | By | Reply More
Texas official after Harvey: The ‘Red Cross was not there’

The Red Cross’ anemic response to Hurricane Harvey left officials in several Texas counties seething, emails obtained by ProPublica show. In some cases, the Red Cross simply failed to show up as it promised it would.

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Las Vegas faced a massacre. Did it have enough trauma centers?

October 4, 2017 | By | Reply More
Las Vegas faced a massacre. Did it have enough trauma centers?

Las Vegas is not only a glittering strip of casinos and hotels but a fast-growing region with more than 2 million residents — and one hospital designated as a highest-level trauma center. The deadly shooting Sunday that killed at least 59 and sent more than 500 people to area hospitals raised questions about whether that’s enough.

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Flat-fee primary care helps fill niche for Texas’ uninsured

October 3, 2017 | By | Reply More
Flat-fee primary care helps fill niche for Texas’ uninsured

Under the practice model, called direct primary care, patients are charged monthly — typically $20 to $75, depending on age, in Graham’s practice — for basic, office-based medical care and frequently cell phone and other after-hours physician access.

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