Child Health, Coronavirus, COVID

How important is the COVID-19 booster shot for 5-to-11-year-olds? 5 questions answered

Naturally, many parents are wondering about the importance and safety of a booster shot for their school-age children. Debbie-Ann Shirley, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at the University of Virginia, answers some common questions about COVID-19 and booster shots in kids that she hears in her practice and explains the research behind why booster shots are recommended for children ages 5 to 11.

Injury Prevention, Mental Health, Women's Health

The Heard v. Depp trial is not just a media spectacle – it is an opportunity to discuss the nuances of intimate partner violence

Strip away the celebrity intrigue and media frenzy, and the high-profile court battle between actors Johnny Depp and Amber Heard involves issues painfully familiar to many women and men across America. intimate partner violence. IPV is experienced by an estimated 6.6 million women and 5.8 million men each year in the U.S.

Picture of an intrauterine device used for contraception
Abortion, Contraception, Politics, Women's Health

Birth Control Limits to Follow Abortion Bans?

Many advocates on reproductive health issues think U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito’s draft opinion overturning Roe v. Wade will further fuel some conservatives’ efforts to limit access to birth control. Although Alito specifically said in the draft that the ruling would not pertain to other rights courts also grounded in privacy, activists worry opponents will marshal his argument on privacy to attack birth control or gay marriage, for example.

Abortion, Law, Politics

Impending demise of Roe v. Wade puts a spotlight on a major privacy risk: Your phone reveals more about you than you think

Using a maps app to plan a route, sending terms to a search engine and chatting online are ways that people actively share their personal data. But mobile devices share far more data than just what their users say or type. They share information with the network about whom people contacted, when they did so, how long the communication lasted and what type of device was used.

Black and white photo of the arm, hand and leg of a child with blistered skin due to monkeypox
Infectious Disease

European outbreak of monkeypox: what you need to know

Monkeypox belongs to the same family of viruses as smallpox, but is less transmissible. People who catch it typically develop a fever and a distinctive rash and blisters. The disease is usually self-limiting, with symptoms disappearing after a few weeks. However, monkeypox can cause severe illness, with outbreaks typically showing a case-fatality rate (the proportion of people with the disease who die from it) of between 1% and 15%, with severe disease and death more likely among children.